zondag 22 september 2013

Seth Godin 2

The Icarus deception : how high will you fly?
Porfolio/Penguin 2012, 241 pagina's - € 16,--

Wikipedia: Seth Godin (1960) en zijn blog

Korte beschrijving
Everyone knows that Icarus's father made him wings and told him not to fly too close to the sun; he ignored the warning and plunged to his doom. The lesson: Play it safe. Listen to the experts. It was the perfect propaganda for the industrial economy. What boss wouldn't want employees to believe that obedience and conformity are the keys to success? But we tend to forget that Icarus was also warned not to fly too low, because seawater would ruin the lift in his wings. Flying too low is even more dangerous than flying too high, because it feels deceptively safe. The safety zone has moved. Conformity no longer leads to comfort. But the good news is that creativity is scarce and more valuable than ever. So is choosing to do something unpredictable and brave: Make art. Being an artist isn't a genetic disposition or a specific talent. It's an attitude we can all adopt. It's a hunger to seize new ground, make connections, and work without a map. If you do those things you're an artist, no matter what it says on your business card.

Fragment
The Icarus Deception

Just south of the Greek island of Samos lies the Icarian Sea. Legend has it that this is where Icarus died – a victim of his hubris.
His father, Deadalus, was a master craftsman. Banished to prison for sabotaging the work of King Minos (captor of the Minotaur). Daedalus created a brilliant escape plot, described in the myth that we were told as children.
He fashioned a set of wings for himself and his son. After affixing the wings with wax, they set out to escape. Daedalus warned Icarus not to fly too close to the sun. Entranced by his magical ability to fly, Icarus disobeyed and flew too high. We all know what happened next: the wax melted and Icarus, the beloved son, lost his wings, tumbled into the sea, and died.
The lesson of this myth: Don’t disobey the king. Don’t disobey your dad. Don’t imagine that you’re better than you are, and most of all, don’t ever believe that you have the ability to do what a god might do.
The part of the myth you weren’t told: in addition to telling Icarus not to fly too high, Daedalus instructed his son not to fly too low, too close to the sea, because the water would ruin the lift in his wings.
Society has altered the myth, encouraging us to forget the part about the sea, and created a culture where we constantly remind one another about the dangers of standing up, standing out and making a ruckus. Industrialists have made hubris a cardinal sin but conveniently ignored a far more common failing: settling for too little.
It’s far more dangerous to fly too low than too high, because it feels safe to fly low. We settle for low expectations and small dreams and guarantee ourselves less than we are capable of. By flying too low, we shortchange not only ourselves but also those who depend on us or might benefit from our work. We’re so obsessed about the risk of shining brightly that we’ve traded in everything that matters to avoid it.
The path that’s available to each of is neither reckless stupidity nor mindless compliance. No, the path that’s available to us is to be human, to do art, and to fly higher than we’ve been taught is possible. We’ve built a world where it’s possible to fly higher than ever, and the tragedy is that we’ve been seduced into believing that we ought to fly ever lower instead. (pagina 1-2)

Youtube; Seth Godin over The Icarus deception (44;28) (20.591 views op 22/9/2013)



Terug naar Overzicht alle titels


Geen opmerkingen:

Een reactie posten

De redactie behoudt zich het recht voor reacties te verwijderen